1782
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Comforts of a Married Life.

Bristol and Bath Magazine 2 (1782) 290-91.

A. Orchard


Six anapestic quatrains, signed "A. Orchard, Bath." The lyric rings a change on the usual theme of courtship, praising the pleasures of wedded love: "How mistaken are all who suppose, | When wedded their joys will be o'er; | For many years I now have been wed, | And was never so happy before." In another variation on the norm, the first and third lines of the stanzas are left unrhymed, as in ballad quatrains. The poet was a regular contributor to the Bristol and Bath Magazine (1782-83), a provincial publication that eeked out a meager poetry column by raids on other periodicals.



How mistaken are all who suppose,
When wedded their joys will be o'er;
For many years I now have been wed,
And was never so happy before.

How pleasing in the eglantine bow'r,
In the heav'nly sweet month of May,
With my lovely fond partner to sit,
And my pratt'ling young bantlings to play.

O! how pleasing to hear their fond talk,
How engaging to see their fond ways;
To find their knowledge and love both increase,
As kind heaven prolongeth their days.

Here the lark's shrillest notes we can hear,
And Philomel's rapturous strain;
View the lambs skip and play round their dams,
Which gives joy and delight to each swain!

There's no pleasure in life can surpass,
That known in an union of hearts;
For all sorrow and sadness then flies,
And joy each transaction imparts.

Grant, Heavens! that I thus may be blest,
Whilst I'm suffer'd to live here below;
So shall my heart and tongue, O my God!
With praises continually flow.

[pp. 290-91]