1788
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

The Prince of Arcadia. A Pastoral Elegy, occasion'd by the King's melancholy Indisposition.

Public Advertiser (20 November 1788).

Mr. Harrison


Five ababcc stanzas "composed by Dr. Arnold, Organist and Composer to His Majesty. The words by Mr. Harrison." The occasion was the King's madness. The stanzas are constructed of pastoral ballad quatrains with an appended couplet. Mr. Harrison is possibly Anthony Harrison, author of The Infant Vision of Shakspeare (1794).



In the realms of Arcadia, the dwelling of Peace,
Why hides ev'ry shepherd his face bath'd in tears;
While the flocks, unattended, their playfulness cease,
And nought but dejection and sorrow apears.
Ah me! good Palemon, the prince of our plain,
Lies rack'd by disease on the sad bed of pain.

The innocent lambkins that frisk'd to the sound
Of the pastoral pipe, as it tunefully play'd,
Now languid recline, with their dams, on the ground,
And bleat to perceive it neglectfully laid!
They know not, Palemon, the prince of our plain,
Lies rack'd by disease, on the sad bed of pain.

The breath that with melody fill'd the sweet pipe,
Alas, pretty dears! is exhausted in sighs;
Our master, in kindess, to virtue so ripe,
In sickness, despair, and in agony lies!
Ah me! good Palemon, the prince of our plain,
Lies rack'd by disease, on the sad bed of pain.

Yet the pipe's softest melody still will we try,
In mournful effusions to him that can heal;
Whose goodness regards ev'ry tear, ev'ry sigh,
Whose mercy may doom us no longer to feel!
No more, good Palemon, the prince of our plain,
Lies rack'd by disease, on the sad bed of pain.

Then again shall Palemon's blest subjects rejoice,
And the lambkins with mirth gayly frolick around,
To hear the sweet pipe, swell'd by gratitude's voice,
While each innocent bosom approves the glad sound.
No more, good Palemon, the prince of our plain,
Lies rack'd by disease, on the sad bed of pain.

[unpaginated]