1768
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Song, in imitation of Shenstone.

St. James's Chronicle or British Evening Post (5 November 1768).

Junto


Three double-quatrain stanzas, signed "Junto." The poet does the Jealousy episode in Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad into a pastoral lyric: "Oh! did you the False-one but know, | The Arts that he us'd to deceive! | You surely would pity the Woe, | Which nothing but Death can relieve." The poet was an occasional contributor to the St. James's Chronicle at this period; most of his contributions were political squibs.



Dear Chloris, you ask me to name
The Cause whence this Sadness appears,
The Wretch that has robb'd me of Fame,
And left me Repentance and Tears:
Oh! did you the False-one but know,
The Arts that he us'd to deceive!
You surely would pity the Woe,
Which nothing but Death can relieve.

His Eyes, like the Brightness of Morn,
Conjoin'd with the Mildness of Eve,
A Chaplet his Brow does adorn,
Which I (sad Remembrance!) did weave:
Around how the Shepherds would throng,
To hear the sweet Accents he sung!
For dull is the Nightingale's Song
To the Music that falls from his Tongue!

Ah! why to a Form so divine,
And a Face so enchantingly fair,
My Heart did I fondly resign,
Nor dream of my future Despair?
E'er since he has fled from these Arms,
No Tongue my Distraction can tell,
But if such — nay much greater his Charms,
What Wonder poor Phyllida fell?

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