1773
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral.

London Magazine 42 (June 1773) 303.

Anonymous


A pastoral lyric in five anapestic quatrains, not signed. "Young Colin" (who generally has nothing in common with Colin Clout but his name) was becoming a fixture in popular songs composed in the pastoral ballad mold. He was generally successful in his addresses, even in stubborn cases like the Phebe of this poem: "But, alas! how regardless she stood! | Nor favour'd the swain with a look: | But lavish'd her charms on the flood, | That murmuring ran down the brook."



Young Colin, the pride of the plains,
As blithesome and blooming as May,
Lay breathing his soul in soft strains,
To Phebe the lovely and gay.

He told her the innocent tale,
Of lovers whose case was his own;
With smiles which so often prevail
On hearts that are obdurate grown.

But, alas! how regardless she stood!
Nor favour'd the swain with a look:
But lavish'd her charms on the flood,
That murmuring ran down the brook.

At length she return'd to her cot,
Well pleas'd with the conquest she'd made:
And pausing, Ah! should she or not,
A sigh her fond bosom betray'd.

The swain his addresses renew'd,
And Phebe then granted a smile,
With rapture the nymph he pursu'd,
Till Hymen rewarded his toils.

[p. 303]