1774
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To Mr. C. K. of Montrose.

Weekly Magazine or Edinburgh Amusement 26 (1 December 1774) 306.

Stella


Stella wittily attempts to break off her verse conversation with C. K.: "Young CORYDON'S friends are so dear, | Oh! how shall I bid you adieu? | It must be for ever, I fear; | May heav'n be propitious to you!" The verses are signed "Stella, Edin. Nov. 28." He responded in the next number. What Robert Fergusson would have thought of all of this we are left to imagine.



Dear shepherd, I hope you'll excuse
The simple reproof I did give,
And altho' very weak is my Muse,
I'll wear the dear wreath while I live.

Thy friendship! how sweet the reward,
How soothing that sound is to me!
For surely the musical BARD
Has breathed his soul into thee.

Suspicion's green eye I disdain;
With thee I could pleasantly stray;
We'd mourn the poetical swain,
And pour out our tears on his clay.

How well did young CORYDON know
These virtuous friendships to prize;
Nor car'd he what malice did flow
From their tongues, or from Argus's eyes.

'Tis the virtuous soul I admire,
And none can these feelings reprove;
When free from all earthly desire,
'Tis that alone I call love.

May health and long life crown thy days,
Soft slumbers attend on thy nights:
May thy dreams (sleeping fancy displays)
Be fill'd with unsully'd delights!

Young CORYDON'S friends are so dear,
Oh! how shall I bid you adieu?
It must be for ever, I fear;
May heav'n be propitious to you!

[p. 306]