1775
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Despair.

London Magazine 44 (February 1775) 95.

Anonymous


A pastoral ballad in six anapestic quatrains, subscribed "Buckingham." This lover's complaint covers the conventional topics and arrives at the conventional conclusion, as the unhappy resolves to retire from the plain to a lonely hermitage: "There unknown I'll repeat all my woes, | Unheard of lament my hard fate; | Since Lucinda such cruelty shews, | Death only shall end my sad state."



Ye shepherds and nymphs of the plain,
O attend for a while to my lays;
Give heed to a sorrowful swain,
Who all his misfortunes displays.

Lucinda, the lovely, the gay,
Who all my affections doth share,
She's sweet as the flowers in May,
But cruel, alas! as she's fair.

She treats me with scorn and disdain,
My sighs are all lost in her ears;
She triumphs and laughs at my pain,
And cruelly sports at my tears!

Thus, despairing, I spend all my days,
Nor can I expect to be blest;
Depriv'd both of comfort and ease,
My soul is a stranger to rest.

I'll seek some disconsolate cell,
Remote from the maid I adore,
No more near her beauties I'll dwell,
I'll contemplate her virtues no more

There unknown I'll repeat all my woes,
Unheard of lament my hard fate;
Since Lucinda such cruelty shews,
Death only shall end my sad state.

[p. 95]