1770
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

On the Death of Miss F—.

Town and Country Magazine 2 (April 1770) 216.

W. Hannaford


A pastoral elegy in three double-quatrain stanzas "Written at the request of a young Lady" signed "W. Hannaford, Totness, April 14." The poet laments the passing of Florimel: "So young to be snatch'd from our arms! | Ere nature perfection had wrought; | But tho' we're depriv'd of her charms, | Her virtues can ne'er be forgot." The name "Florimel," which is not common in pastoral verse, is possibly taken from the Faerie Queene.



Since Daphne will hear me complain,
No longer my sorrows I'll hide;
But, Oh! how unwelcome the strain,
Which tells us that Florimel dy'd.
She dy'd! but Oh! why was it mine
The sorrowful tale to relate?
But tho' 'twere a fault to repine,
Allow me to mourn at her fate.

So young to be snatch'd from our arms!
Ere nature perfection had wrought;
But tho' we're depriv'd of her charms,
Her virtues can ne'er be forgot.
Oh! Death too relentless to spare
In Florimel all that could please;
In Florimel all that was dear,
And 'reft us of comfort and ease.

But hence let me haste to the grove,
And there strive to solace my grief;
Since pastimes no pleasure can prove,
And mirth can afford no relief;
Then yearly when maids shall attend,
Oh! be it with sorrow exprest,
That, once the gay hope of each friend,
Now silently sleeps in the dust.

[p. 216]