1776
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral on the First of January.

Town and Country Magazine 8 (January 1776) 47.

Leander


Eight anapestic stanzas, "Addressed to Eliza B—" and signed "Leander, Oxon, Jan. 14, 1776." Leander, who had last addressed Eliza in a poem in the Town and Country Magazine dated December 14, now extends to her his good wishes for for the coming year and enjoins her to avoid other lovers: "Remember thy languishing swain, | Nor list to thy suitors around; | Oh! fly from the artful and vain, | For all my fond heart is thy own."



Eliza, thou boast of the plain,
Thou pride of my pastoral muse,
O! listen, my fair, to the strain,
Which Isis in vain can refuse.

All nature deplores the late year,
And echo's its joys are away;
In vain shall its pastimes appear,
And bid us be careless and gay.

Yet Aries revives us agin,
And asks the fond incense and pray'r;
"Be candid, and banish her pain,
Be fairest Eliza thy care."

O! let her around the long year,
In pleasure and innocence rove;
Oh! bid her be blest as she's fair;
Oh! bid her be true as her love.

And when you return to my fair,
Oh! let her in silence reply,
"In peace I have trac'd the gay year,
In peace I contented can die."

Remote, in the cloistered vale,
Where science reclines on her bays,
Thy swain (may his wishes prevail!)
Thy swain with sincerity prays.

Then fairest Eliza adieu!
And while by the side of the grove
You muse, and our pleasure review,
Where oft I have whisper'd my love.

Remember thy languishing swain,
Nor list to thy suitors around;
Oh! fly from the artful and vain,
For all my fond heart is thy own.

[p. 47]