1766
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Song.

The Laurel-Wreath; being a Collection of original Miscellaneous Poems, on Subjects Moral, Comic, and Divine. By W. P. 2 Vols.

Dr. William Perfect


A pastoral ballad in five anapestic quatrains. Colin, who has treated the ladies, now expects a return: "He went to the wake in the dale, | And bought you up ribbons a score: | He paid for the dance in the vale, | But now he is able no more." This poem, in a distinctly lower register, rings changes on the pastoral-ballad theme of the impoverished but sincere swain. William Perfect would become one of the most prolific composers of poems in the pastoral ballad mode, though he was very slow to come to it. In his first two volumes of poems (this is the second) he inclined more to elegiac quatrains. John Nichols contributed to this volume.



Ye rose-colour'd damsels attend
A swain with an innocent heart!
Your mercy to COLIN extend;
To COLIN, devoid of all art.

He once had a pocket that shone
With guineas most heavenly bright:
"Come, take them," he cry'd, "they're your own:"
The ladies he loves to delight!

You know with what fondness you run,
While his money so tempting remain'd;
And you know, how you made him your sun,
When from presents your shepherd refrain'd.

He went to the wake in the dale,
And bought you up ribbons a score:
He paid for the dance in the vale,
But now he is able no more.

Some pity bestow on the swain;
Compassion don't fail to advance;
Lest, angry, this should be his strain,
"He pipes not, so you will not dance."

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