1773
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral.

Hibernian Magazine 3 (October 1773) 556.

Anonymous


A pastoral ballad in five double-quatrain stanzas, not signed. Delia, having been jilted by Damon, declames bitterly against the hypocrisy of male lovers: "To each easy damsel they meet, | Who will hearken to what they maintain, | With false declarations they greet, | Then smile at the conquest they gain." Much of the poetry in the Hibernian Magazine was reprinted from other sources.



Those moments of rapture are fled
When peace my fond bosom possess'd,
My pleasure how languid and dead,
Since Damon, false youth, I caress'd:
No more I those pleasures shall share,
No more the sweet transport shall prove,
When late I'd no cause for to fear,
Or doubt of our mutual love.

Ye nymphs who inhabit the plains,
Be cautious in whom you believe;
Least like Damon in flattering strains,
They court you like him to deceive.
The men oft with vows and with sighs,
Will melt you to pity and love;
While their action their passion denies,
And their treach'rous purposes prove.

Listen not to the tales that they tell,
Nor confide in what they declare,
When on praising your beauties they dwell,
And vow that you're lovely and fair:
To each easy damsel they meet,
Who will hearken to what they maintain,
With false declarations they greet,
Then smile at the conquest they gain.

Whoe'er would have doubted the truth
Of what Damon so often declar'd?
When honour seem'd form'd in the youth,
And his passion so ardent appear'd?
How oft while the birds on the spray
Did carol the sonets of love,
Wou'd Damon with Delia stray
Among shades of woodbine to rove?

But gone are those scenes from my sight,
That with him so pleas'd I partook,
No more shall I share the delight
That I felt at my shepherd's kind look:
I'll banish his form from my mind,
Nor act as I've oft done before,
Since Damon to Delia's unkind
I'll never believe a swain more.

[p. 556]