1786
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

In Imitation of Shenstone.

Walker's Hibernian Magazine (November 1785) 606.

C. M.


Four double-quatrain stanzas, signed "C. M." Unlike most imitations of Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad, this imitation takes up the gardening theme associated with the poet of the Leasowes: "Such natural beauties are there, | And verdure e'er smiles o'er the land; | Much grac'd they will be by my fair, | And improv'd by her fost'ring hand." The poet was a regular contributor to the Hibernian Magazine.

In 1786 the Hibernian Magazine added "Walker's" to its masthead, after the name of its publisher.



I've found out a spot for my fair,
Where the woodbines and ivy do meet,
Sweet vi'lets perfume all the air,
And daisies bloom under his feet;
Where clumps of green holly adorn,
A brook that meandering flows,
And bleating flocks just newly shorn,
Resound through the neighbouring groves.

The plowman there turns up the ground,
And whistles along through the day;
The vallies with lowings resound,
As homewards the herd wind their way;
The hills bloom around with the thorn,
The lawns are all cover'd with hay,
Green hedges, the fields do adorn,
And birds sweetly sing on each spray.

Such natural beauties are there,
And verdure e'er smiles o'er the land;
Much grac'd they will be by my fair,
And improv'd by her fost'ring hand.
Contentment will always attend,
And harmony tune its sweet lyre;
Dear Plenty her friendship will lend,
As soon as she joins in the choir.—

Then, come my fair, let us away?
Together we'll plant the sweet rose,
Then haste thee, fond damsel, I pray?
See the zephyr, inviting us, blows:
The flowers shed forth their perfume
Round the place, that I've fix'd for your seat;
The trees in their foliage now bloom,
The shepherds have nam'd it Retreat.

[p. 606]