1774
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral Ballad.

Westminster Magazine 2 (August 1774) 430-31.

Edwin


A pastoral elegy in six anapestic quatrains. Colinet mourns Emma in an unusual tone of pious resignation: "The end of her pilgrimage here, | Was to fit her for mansions of bliss; | Then indulge not the murmuring tear, | Nor lament such an exit as this." The poem is signed "Edwin," possible after Beattie's The Minstrel, the second book of which had recently appeared. Edwin contributed a number of poems to the Westminster Magazine, including some stanzas addressed to Francis Noel Clarke Mundy.



Since Emma the perfect is flown
To the regions of permanent rest,
Perversely will Colinet moan,
And wish the dear Seraph unblest?

What tho' she were pride of the plain,
What tho' she were queen of the dance;
What tho' she gave joy to the swain,
And rivalled the flowers of romance?

The fair one forsook with a smile
The pleasures that once she held dear:
For Colinet these are but vile,
Compar'd with a bliss more sincere.

What tho' she were joy to your heart,
What tho' she were light to your eye;
What tho' the kind Fair would impart
Each rapture, each tear, and each sigh?

The end of her pilgrimage here,
Was to fit her for mansions of bliss;
Then indulge not the murmuring tear,
Nor lament such an exit as this.

Since Emma the peerless is flown
To the regions of permanent rest,
Perversely should Colinet moan—
He has not a wish to be blest.

[pp. 430-31]