1776
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral.

Westminster Magazine 4 (May 1776) 271.

T.


A pastoral ballad in six anapestic quatrains, signed "T." The swain has apparently given offence to his Delia: "Ye nymphs, and ye shepherds, come join, | With me the dear charmer implore, | Ah! let her again but be kind, | And I shall be happy once more." The Westminster Magazine reprinted the poem in July, apparently from the London Chronicle, which had reprinted it from the Westminster Magazine. It may have been circulating elsewhere, for it was reprinted in the Massachusetts Magazine as late as 1793.



My days of delight are no more,
Sweet moments of pleasure and peace;
The smile of the Morning is o'er,
And Night bids his horror increase.

The landscape, which smil'd to the view,
When Innocence gladden'd the day;
The flowrets which glitter'd with dew,
Alas! are alike pass'd away.

'Twas Delia which made them look bright,
Her presence enlighten'd the scene;
Her absence had hid them in night,
For she of the plain was the Queen.

Yet ah! how severe to my mind,
My folly has banish'd the Fair;
To her merit and worthiness blind,
I rightly am doom'd to despair.

Yet gentle's her bosom, I know,
How lovely and sweet to behold!
Tho' white as the fleece-fallen snow,
'Twas never, no, never, so cold.

Ye nymphs, and ye shepherds, come join,
With me the dear charmer implore,
Ah! let her again but be kind,
And I shall be happy once more.

[p. 271]