1793
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

The Poet on Parting with his Garden.

New Lady's Magazine, or, Polite, Entertaining, and Fashionable Companion for the Fair Sex 8 (July 1793) 334.

Edwin


A pastoral lyric in nine anapestic quatrains signed "Edwin." The garden becomes emblematic of Emma's virtues, which the poet is compelled to leave behind: "Adieu to fertility's charms, | Of nature the fondest delight; | Ye powers protect them from harms, | The fatal north easterly blight." The poet was a regular contributor to the New Lady's Magazine.



Adieu! my sweet garden, adieu!
Adieu to each favourite flow'r!
The suckle combin'd with the yew,
Constructing simplicity's bow'r.

When oft the cool moments I've pass'd,
And sung of the spring-mantl'd year,
The Muse for my Emma embrac'd,
To friendship and truth ever dear.

The morn's snowy bosom, as fair
Is the mind of my charmer confest;
Ye gales in my absence declare
The whispers of love from my breast.

Adieu to the sweet-blushing rose,
The lily as fragrant as white,
The berry that bleeds as it blows,
To yield more substantial delight.

Adieu to the pleasures of May,
Each plant in my garden so fair;
The trees that rich blossoms display,
And burden with odours the air.

Adieu to fertility's charms,
Of nature the fondest delight;
Ye powers protect them from harms,
The fatal north easterly blight.

Adieu to each picturesque scene,
Ye hawthorns so lavish of bloom,
Ye shrubs of perpetual green,
Enhancing the summer's perfume.

Adieu to the nest in the hedge,
Let virtue parental prevail;
The younglings in safety shall fledge,
And harmony pour o'er the dale.

Farewel to affection so true,
My Emma, e'er constant and kind,
My heart shall reside still with you,
Though I leave you reluctant behind.

[p. 334]