1787
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Lines, humbly addressed to Miss Catherine C—h.

New Lady's Magazine, or, Polite, Entertaining, and Fashionable Companion for the Fair Sex 2 (May 1787) 267.

Strephon


A pastoral lyric in four double-quatrains signed "Strephon." In fact the pastoral imagery disappears after the first line in a poem asserting the poet's desire to be reunited with his fair: "Oh! no — let it never be said | That patience exists with true love: | I shall soon see again the dear maid— | This only can sorrow remove."



Each shepherd still praises his maid
When fancy and spirit combine;
Why should I then, dear girl, be afraid
To celebrate charms such as thine?
Though rough and unpolish'd my verse,
I mean not my strains to refine;
Yet I cannot refrain to rehearse
The charms of my Kate so divine.

When so lately I bade you adieu,
My heart torn with sorrow and grief,
I thought, without ceasing, on you,
And tears then afforded relief:
I consider'd, how short is our bliss!
I reflected, that misery's sure!
I said to my heart, Think on this,
And let patience afford you a cure!

Can patience (said love) assuage care,
And teach me the charms to forget;
The charms of my ever-dear fair,
And say, Cease to repine and to fret?
Oh! no — let it never be said
That patience exists with true love:
I shall soon see again the dear maid—
This only can sorrow remove.

My happiness then will return,
When I shall revisit my fair;
I shall cease to lament and to mourn,
And then bid adieu to my care:
Fly swift ev'ry hour, and each day,
Oh hear! — and oh grant my request!
And when with my fair I shall say,
'Tis now that I'm happy and blest!

[p. 267]