1791
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Pastoral. Adressed to Laura.

Literary Magazine and British Review 5 (June 1791) 465-66.

Anonymous


A pastoral ballad in six anapestic quatrains, not signed. Daphnis compains of his neglect by Laura: "How happy I stray'd o'er the plain, | When my love met an equal return, | When Laura would list to my strain, | But alas she has left me to mourn." He resolves to bid farewell to the joys of the Spring.



Dear Laura, how can you behold
The sorrow and heart-wasting grief,
Which Daphnis now feels, — and withhold
Your smiles, that would give him relief.

No longer he cares for his sheep,
Or tends his fair flock on the hill,
Where his goats us'd to browse on the steep,
That hangs o'er yon murm'ring rill.

No longer his pipe cheers the vale,
Where careless he often would stray;
Where violets scent the soft gale,
And the lark hails the new born day.

Dejected now, sad and forsaken,
To the winds he is heard to complain;
"Fair Laura derides me with scorn,
And my tears and my sighs are all vain.

"How happy I stray'd o'er the plain,
When my love met an equal return,
When Laura would list to my strain,
But alas she has left me to mourn.

"Farewel then ye joys of the spring,
Farewel, I shall see you no more,
To me ye no pleasure could bring,
Since I'm slighted by her I adore."

[pp. 465-66]