1782
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

On E. A. leaving Bristol.

Bristol and Bath Magazine 2 (1782) 125-26.

Anonymous


Seven anapestic quatrains, not signed. Eliza has left Bristol for a place of retirement, leaving her friends Lorenzo and the poet behind: "But, why should the shepherd thus mourn? | Or give himself up to dispair; | For tho' she should never return, | Lorenzo may follow her there." The Bristol and Bath Magazine, which survived to publish three volumes, was one of the more unassuming periodicals of the era.



Eliza has quitted the town,
And far from its pleasures remov'd;
From friends she entitled her own,
And scenes she could ever have lov'd.

To her friends that took leave of her last,
She breath'd out a tender adieu,
"Alas! for the hours that are past,
Which I spent with Lorenzo and you."

Lorenzo, fond shepherd, was there,
And saw the lov'd nymph on her way;
"How cruel he cry'd, is my fair!
So sudden to hasten away."

But, why should the shepherd thus mourn?
Or give himself up to dispair;
For tho' she should never return,
Lorenzo may follow her there.

Adieu my Eliza — fair maid,
May health, and her sister — content,
With their rosy-cheek'd train be convey'd,
To where thy blest moments are spent.

May the Loves and the Graces unite,
And their influence over thee shine,
May the Virtues, become thy delight,
And their Beauties, Eliza, be thine.

May flatterers never attend,
Thy peace to invade or destroy,
But serenity smile to the end,
And thy Close, be without an alloy.

[pp. 125-26]