1808
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Pastoral in imitation of Shenstone. Corydon to Phillida.

Cabinet, or Monthly Report of Polite Literature 3 (March 1808) 206-07.

P.


A pastoral ballad in eight anapestic quatrains signed "P." This late example of the genre presents what would seem to be a new sentiment: "When I look on the favourite kid, | Whose shoulder with blue-bells you gird, | (The wish you can never forbid,) | I long to be one of the herd." The Cabinet, which lasted for four semi-annual volumes in 1807 and 1808 published some valuable author biographies, and some less valuable poetry.



O! Phillida, hear the distress
My heart can no longer conceal;
Ah! why should I fear to confess
What beauty commands me to feel?

To feel that the joys of the plain,
Oh! never can solace impart,
While Phillida frowns in disdain,
Or Corydon's tender of heart.

As odorous blossoms of May,
That lure the industrious swarm,
Which bloom in the smile of the day,
But fade in the frown of the storm,

So Phillida wrinkles her brow,
And my bosom is ready to break;
But heavens, oh! I cannot tell how,
When dimples inhabit her cheek.

When I look on the favourite kid,
Whose shoulder with blue-bells you gird,
(The wish you can never forbid,)
I long to be one of the herd:

To play on the banks of the brook
Where strawberry clusters are ripe,
And hear, as you lean on your crook,
Soft melody flow from your pipe.

Disorder encircles me round,
The stores of my dairy decay,
Untill'd is my desolate ground,
My cattle are running astray.

O! Phillida, never again
The sighs of my bosom will cease,
Till you share with your pastoral swain
The blessings of conjugal peace.

[pp. 206-07]