1760
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To Mirth.

Royal Magazine or Gentleman's Monthy Companion 3 (October 1760) 211.

Aramont


An allegorical ode in five octosyllabic quatrains, after Milton's L'Allegro, signed "Aramont, London, Oct. 14, 1760." Mirth is celebrated in something like the antique manner: "Blythsome let us sing and play, | All the gladsome, live-long day: | Life was form'd for joy and love, | Emblem of the state above." The poet contributed several poems to the Royal Magazine.

Walter Graham: "The Royal Magazine (1759-1771), as far as its contents are concerned, is merely another eighteenth-century magazine. It contained the usual components, and is in no wise distinguished, except by Goldsmith's four essays" English Literary Periodicals (1930) 176-77.



Hence! far hence, corroding care,
Envy foul, and black despair:
Hence be banish'd every pain,
Looks demure, and cold disdain.

Welcome mirth, and festive song,
Welcome all thy jocund throng;
Be thou, and only thou our guide,
Ev'ry gloomy thought deride.

Blythsome let us sing and play,
All the gladsome, live-long day:
Life was form'd for joy and love,
Emblem of the state above.

Fill, then, fill the flowing glass,
Chearful let the goblet pass;
While the sprightly health goes round,
Let the jovial rebecs sound.

Happy! truly happy he!
Ever tranquil, ever free,
Who enjoys a state so blest,
By nor cares or fears distrest.

[p. 211]