1789
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Candid Courtship.

Christian's, Scholar's, and Farmer's Magazine 1 (June-July 1789) 265.

Anonymous


A pastoral dialogue in four double-quatrains, not signed. When Florimel offers his hand, Daphne is quick to respond: "'Tis enough to be Florimel's wife, | And duties domestic fulfil; | I am sure I can love your for life, | So I thank you, I think that I will." This singularly unerotic pastoral appears in a bi-monthly published in Elizabethtown, New Jersey.



FLORIMEL.
Is Daphne the pride of the plain,
Content to be Florimel's spouse?
Can she listen with love to his strain?
Is she charm'd with the villager's vows?
The kidlings that browze on the rock,
And the fleeces that bathe in the rill,
Nay, the all of my pastoral flock,
Believe me, is her's, if she will.

DAPHNE.
Good shepherd, be artless and wise?
Can ambition with meekness agree?
Contentment's the charter I prize,
No wealth has a virtue for me.
'Tis enough to be Florimel's wife,
And duties domestic fulfil;
I am sure I can love your for life,
So I thank you, I think that I will.

FLORIMEL.
The miser his plumb may possess,
The statesman his title and star,
Our cares and our crimes will be less,
And sha'nt we be happier far?
From fortune we'll brave each rebuff,
Your smiles can adversity kill;
Your heart will be treasure enough,
And I'll keep it, dear Daphne, I will.

DAPHNE.
My candour coquets may despise,
And prudes may my passion condemn:
But innocence scorns a disguise,
And I hope I'm as modest as them;
And, I think, if there's faith in the brook,
I'm as fair as the maid of the Mill;
So Florimel give me your crook,
For in sooth I'm determin'd I will.

[p. 265]