1806
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Hint to Pastoral Writers.

Port Folio NS 1 (15 February 1806) 92-93.

Anonymous


A burlesque pastoral in six anapestic quatrains, not signed. The poet, a rural character, looks askance on representations of country life in pastoral verse: "He sings of the sweet gentle zephyrs, | So charming to those who an't near 'em, | Lambs bleating, and mild lowing heifers, | So pleasant to those who don't hear 'em."

Headnote: "The last Stanzas of the ensuing burlesque have been published before. But we are studious to preserve the whole of a very successful sarcasm upon Shenstone and Co." p. 92.



Your Poet most saucily writes,
On subjects he can't understand,
And talks of the "Village delights,"
Up three pair of stairs in the Strand.

He sings of the sweet gentle zephyrs,
So charming to those who an't near 'em,
Lambs bleating, and mild lowing heifers,
So pleasant to those who don't hear 'em.

Of shepherds as true as the Sun,
Of damsels as chaste as the moon;
If the Poet means aught but his fun,
I'll tell him another tale soon.

His zephyrs I cannot espouse,
For often my corn they will parch;
And I know that the roof of my house
Was most sweetly blown off in the last March.

The cow, in my yard, which I keep,
All night does her calf so bemoan,
That I can't get a wink of good sleep,
Though I'm weary and lying alone.

Of nymphs, and of swains, what they say,
I never could read but I smil'd,
For my shepherd's — at Botany Bay,
And my dairy-maid's always with child.

[pp. 92-93]