1813
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Burlesque of the Pastoral.

Juvenile Port-Folio 1 (27 February 1813) 80.

Anonymous


A burlesque pastoral ballad in four anapestic quatrains, not signed. The poem ridicules pastoral simplicity and the objective correlative: "She nodded — the tree nodded too, | She murmur'd, and so did the rill; | She wept, and the evening dew | Fell in tears on the neighbouring hill." The Juvenile Port-Folio was published weekly in Philadelphia from 1812 to 1816, edited by Thomas G. Condie, Jr. In 1817 this poem was reprinted under the title of "A Burlesque, in imitation of Enchanted Pastoral."



'Twas morning and Mary arose,
Her stockings and garters put on;
Instinctively follow'd her nose,
And walk'd with her back to the Sun.

She smil'd and the woods were illum'd,
She sigh'd and the vales were depress'd;
She breath'd and the air was perfum'd,
She frown'd and saw nature distress'd.

She nodded — the tree nodded too,
She murmur'd, and so did the rill,
She wept, and the evening dew—
Fell in tears on the neighbouring hill.

She stept and fair flow'rs sprang up,
She blush'd and the rose look'd more red,
She was hungry — she went home and supt,
She was tired, and so — went to bed.

[p. 80]