1795 ca.
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Song.

Poems on Several Occasions. By the late Rev. Thomas Browne.

Rev. Thomas Browne


A pastoral ballad in the Yorkshire dialect, in which the young speaker declares her independence from an overreaching (though possibly wiser) mother: "When however I com' to be sixteen year auld, | An' rattled and ramp'd amang men, | My Mother wad call o' me in, an' would scauld, | And cry — Huzzy! tak' care o' thysen" p. 154. Several anonymous poems of a like theme had appeared in the newspapers in recent decades, more ballad than pastoral. Thomas Browne's poems were posthumously published after his early death.



When I was a wee little tottering bairn,
An' had nobbut just gitten short frocks;
When to gang, I at first was beginnin' to lairn,
On my brow I gat monie hard knocks:
For se waik, an' se silly, an' helpless was I,
I was always a tumbling down then,
While me mother would twattle me gently, and cry,
Honey Jenny! tak' care o' thysen.

When I grew bigger, an' gat to be strang,
'At I cannily ran all about,
By mysen, whor I lik'd, then I always mud gang,
Bithout bein' tell'd about ought.
When however I com' to be sixteen year auld,
An' rattled and ramp'd amang men,
My Mother wad call o' me in, an' would scauld,
And cry — Huzzy! tak' care o' thysen.

I've a sweetheart comes now upo' Setterday nights,
An' he swears at he'll mak me his wife—
My Mam grows se stingy, she scaulds and she flytes,
And twitters me out of my life.
But she may leuk sour an' consait hersen wise,
An' preach again likin' young men;
Sen I's grown a woman her clack I'll despise,
And Ise — marry! — tak' care o' mysen.

[pp. 154-55]