1791
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Cecelia, or Miss J. E—t—o.

Weekly Museum 3 (30 July 1791).

Amicitia


Four double-quatrain stanzas signed "Amicitia, New-York, July 22, 1791." The poet expresses her admiration for the fair Cecelia: "Cecelia's soft accents excell, | To friendship she sounds her kind lute: | The swains with pure extacy swell, | The lambkins are silent and mute." The New York Weekly Museum published original and reprinted verse.



Fond Shepherds attend to my notes,
The charms of Cecelia I sing:
Kind warblers come tune your sweet throats,
With the tend'rest notes of the spring.
Let the woodlands, with melody sound;
The Zephyrs, with harmony glow;
The vallies, with echo resound;
And rills with soft tenderness flow.

Cecelia's soft accents excell,
To friendship she sounds her kind lute:
The swains with pure extacy swell,
The lambkins are silent and mute.
The Nightingale moves to her rest,
To silence she's charm'd by the fair,
While the Thrush's soft notes do attest,
The Shepherd opprest by loves care.

High transports, my bosom inspire:
I gaze and am lost in delight!
Even Seraphs, might gaze and admire,
Where charms thus celesti'l unite.
"With her mien, she inamours the brave,
With her wit, she engages the free,
With her modesty, pleases the grave;
She's ev'ry way pleasing to me."

The Nectar which rests on each lip,
The Gods, might contend for in vain,
Not Cupid, his arrow shall dip;
'Tis decreed to the worthy'st swain.
Thrice happy! that swain when possest,
Of Cecelia's hand (with her heart)—
He! shall with contentment be blest,
His lambs too their gladness impart.

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