1805 ca.
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

To Chaucer. (As if by a contemporary Writer.)

Collective works of the late Dr. Sayers; to which have been prefixed some biographic particulars by W. Taylor of Norwich.

Dr. Frank Sayers


A set of undated commendatory verses praising the Canterbury Tales in the auntient manner: "Certes, gode Geffray, eche shall con thie song, | And leve eche song he conneth be thie best." Archaisms aside, the mode is that of periodical verse contemporary with Sayers, a Norwich poet who seems not to left commendatory verses addressed verses to any of his own contemporaries. The poem is followed by a brief glossary: "Forsyth, for since — lefe, dear — galiard, gay — gle, melody — leys, lays — stalwart, bold — gisarme, a kind of halbert — corven, carved — ronn nat, cease not — gergon, prating — leve, believe." In his later years Sayers was much given to the study of antiquities, and particularly church architecture.



Forsyth thowe beest the fyrst gode harpour wight
That sang full swotilie in lefe Englonde,
This galiard gle me doth to grete delite,
And in low curtesie I kiss this hond;
Now thie queint leys of stalwart knightes do tell,
Of gisarmes split, and haubergeons riven,
And now of monkes ystall'd in corven cell,
And now of wincing wives to daliaunce givin;
Ronn nat to glittern in the gergon throng,
But swell thie renomie at my behest,
Certes, gode Geffray, eche shall con thie song,
And leve eche song he conneth be thie best.

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