1778
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Scotch Song.

General Advertiser and Morning Intelligencer (30 June 1778).

Anonymous


A pastoral lyric in three double-quatrain stanzas, not signed. Scotch songs were ordinarily composed in English rather than Scots (at least those appearing in London newspapers) making this a particularly interesting contribution to the series of poems imitating Shenstone's Pastoral Ballad. The poet appears to shift into English as she addresses polite readers: "The seite wad do guid to the eyne, | O' the gentles in cities that thrang, | Methinks they would relish a scene, | That is buried the vallies amang."



My cottage I built i' the haugh,
Where the lavrocks awaken'd the day,
By the burnie that's shaded wi' saugh,
And wallops sae sweetly away.
The burnie is ting'd wi' the sky,
And its border wi' gowans is spread;
Not a rigg, nor a meadow is nigh,
But with lilies and roses is clad.

My cot is with eglantine bound,
And altho' it be thatch'd wi' strae,
The woodbines that wommel around,
Make it landart and pleasantly gay;
The seite wad do guid to the eyne,
O' the gentles in cities that thrang,
Methinks they would relish a scene,
That is buried the vallies amang.

Wad Willie now speak but as free,
As I ken that his heart is inclin'd,
How blithsome and coothy we'd be,
When our hands as our wishes are join'd?
Last ewk as we travell'd the hill,
By his mumping I ken what he meant;
His heart it click-clack'd like the mill,
And his eyne were not his when he went.

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