1778
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

A Trip o'er the Green. A Pastoral Song.

General Advertiser and Morning Intelligencer (6 August 1778).

William Hawkins


A pastoral ballad in six anapestic quatrains "Written by Mr. Hawkins, Author of Pastoral Poems, &c. &c." The poem describes an auspicious courtship: "Then streight he came to me, and proffer'd a kiss, | At which I seem'd modest and shy; | Yet I vow in my heart I was pleas'd at this, | Though he made me to flutter and sigh." Hawkins had published The Shrubs of Parnassus in 1776.



One day o'er the green, as I tript it along,
A gentle young shepherd past by;
He play'd on his pipe, and so sweet was his song,
He made my poor heart for to sigh.

He called me back to sit by him a while,
(The swain I could scarcely deny)
So sweetly he look'd! and he gave me a smile,
Which caus'd me still more for to sigh.

Then streight he came to me, and proffer'd a kiss,
At which I seem'd modest and shy;
Yet I vow in my heart I was pleas'd at this,
Though he made me to flutter and sigh.

He told me he lov'd me, and something beside,
Which I must not repeat, by the bye!
For fear the young shepherd my conduct shou'd chide,
And make me for ever to sigh.

He promis'd to take me next week to the fair,
And many fine things he will buy;
Both roses and ribbons to stick in my hair,
Then who'll be so shewy as I?

And if that the swain should make me his wife,
To please him all means I will try;
I'll never be faithful, and love him for life,
And virtuous until that I die.

[unpaginated]