1787
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

An Ode on a Lady's Sickness.

Columbian Herald or the Patriotic Courier of North-America (4 January 1787).

Anonymous


A Miltonic allegorical ode in pentameter couplets, not signed: "Let health, bright Goddess, all her blessings shed, | Come, cherub, come! — dispell the lowering gloom, | Bid in her Cheeks again, the roses bloom; | Bid her eyes sparkle with their wonted fire, | And let the Bard again, the Maid admire." The Columbian Herald, a Charleston, South Carolina newspaper, does not present the poem as an original.



Hence, pale disease! stern slave of death and night,
From spotless virtue take thy rapid flight;
Go! — seek the scenes where lawless pleasure reigns,
There bid the sons of riot feel thy pains;
And let Impiety's too numerous band,
Know all the terrors of thy chast'ning hand.
Awaken'd from a ceaseless round of joy,
Repentance then, their leisure may employ.
But leave Eliza; — o'er her lovely head,
Let health, bright Goddess, all her blessings shed,
Come, cherub, come! — dispell the lowering gloom,
Bid in her Cheeks again, the roses bloom;
Bid her eyes sparkle with their wonted fire,
And let the Bard again, the Maid admire.

Or rather thou! — at whose supreme command,
Pale sickness rages thro' a bleeding land;
Author of life, of health, of pain, of joy,
Oh! view the sufferer with a tender eye;
Pity a Parent's pangs, — a Sister's tears,
Regard their sorrows — grant their fervent prayers,
And longer spare to bleeding friendship's sighs
The lovely maiden, from her native skies.

[unpaginated]