1793
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Ode — to Spring.

City Gazette and Daily Advertiser (22 March 1793).

Symplicia


A pastoral lyric in the ballad measure signed "Symplicia" in three stanzas: "Then children of genius come join in my song, | While my heart bounds in rapture, let's trip it along." The City Gazette was published in Charleston, South Carolina. Symplicia was a sometimes contributor to the City Gazette.



No slow pac'd wise matrons shall stop my career,
I'll dance over sorrow, my heart shall be free,
For Spring is returning, the pride of the year,
And fortune has promis'd continual May.
The birds carrol sweetly, come join in my song,
My heart bounds with rapture, let's trip it along.

Hark, the woodlands invite, thro' forrest and grove,
Fair nature has sported with unbounded glee,
Shrill echo repeats 'tis the season for love,
And hails my fond bosom — we all shall be free.
Follow young men and maidens, and join in my song,
My heart bounds with rapture, let's trip it along.

Come friends to my party, unbounded as tho't,
Sweet Flora is busy in decking her bower;
'Tis the heyday of pleasure, and fancy full fra't,
Shall dictate to pass thro' the light-footed hour.
Then children of genius come join in my song,
While my heart bounds in rapture, let's trip it along.

[unpaginated]