1793
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

The Fine Morning. An Address to Celia.

State Gazette of South-Carolina (10 October 1793).

Laura


A pastoral song signed "Laura" in six anapestic quatrains in the manner of William Perfect: "My Celia! awake and behold | The morning so tranquil and fair; | Retire to the foot of yon hill, | And breathe the salubrious air." This Charleston paper offers the poem as "selected poetry."



How sweet is the breath of the morn,
On the wing of the soft fanning breeze;
How fresh are the dew drops that sit
On the leaves of the slow-waving trees.

The blush that empurples the east,
How modest and charming a die;
The bow in the clouds fades away,
But morn's rosy light gilds the sky.

The warblers begin their loud songs,
The groves all resound with their notes;
How sweet is the music they chaunt,
As soft in the breezes it floats.

My Celia! awake and behold
The morning so tranquil and fair;
Retire to the foot of yon hill,
And breathe the salubrious air.

There gently meanders a stream,
Midst Flora's delightful perfumes;
The lily adorns its green banks,
And there the wild rose sweetly blooms.

The tall elm, majestic and fair,
Hangs o'er the chrystaline stream,
Observe its dark form on the wave,
Ere Sol has rekindled his beam.

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