1800
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

The Wedding Day.

South-Carolina State Gazette and Timothy's Daily Adviser (10 November 1800).

Anonymous


A pastoral ballad in ten unsigned anapestic quatrains reprinted "From the Commercial Gazette." The poet has decided to wed her Harry: "By the rivulet straying one eve, | While my lips he with kisses imprest, | My heart of its bosom took leave, | And shelter'd itself in his breast." The verse in this American pastoral is of the homeliest character.



Make haste all ye nymphs to the grove,
Beneath the old elm tree's calm shade;
Where often we've talk'd over love,
And boasted the conquest we made:

With his pipe, let the shepherd come here,
Let mirth ev'ry pleasure enhance;
We will eat of the fruit of the year,
And trip in the mazy-wrought dance.

Let the village be glad and rejoice,
Let all be as happy as me;
Let the birds thro' the woods tune their voice,
To join in the heart cheering glee.

For I promis'd my Henry this day
To give him my hand as his own;
And my heart swells with joy to repay,
The love that to me he has shewn.

By the rivulet straying one eve,
While my lips he with kisses imprest,
My heart of its bosom took leave,
And shelter'd itself in his breast.

He felt it instead of his own,
Which I instantly caught as it fled;
And I said that his bliss I would crown,
And to-day with my Harry be wed.

He's the prettiest youth o'er the plain,
The shepherds all call him so kind;
I could love him again and again,
He's so fair in his face and his mind.

From the girl that can't give ev'n a kiss,
To her that some swain loves to woo,
May they all have a share of my bliss;
As I'm happy, let others be too.

The western gale freshens the fields,
And nature now smiles on each joy:
Their perfume the flowers too, yield
To sweeten the grove for my boy.

Then come, my companions; with haste,
To join in my heart cheering glee,
'Tis pleasure that we here shall taste,
'Tis the wedding of HARRY and me.

[unpaginated]