1794
ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Corydon's Complaint. A Pastoral.

St. James's Chronicle or British Evening Post (1 May 1794).

R.


Two double-quatrain stanzas signed "R., Newport, Monmouthshire, April 21, 1794." The poet laments the death of his lover. The tune for this song is specified as "The Banks of the Severn."



My measures so sprightly awhile,
The songs of my happier days,
When Pleasure the time did beguile,
When Rapture inspir'd all my lays;
Ah! never again will they flow,
Alas! for my wound is too deep;
No joy now must Corydon know,
But 'mong the bent willows must weep.

My brow is o'er clouded with care,
The tears they still flow down my cheek,
I mourn for the loss of my dear,
She's gone — and my heart, oh! 'twill break:
Then Death come thou quick to my aid,
Afford the relief thou can'st give;
I'll fly to embrace the dear maid,
In realms where we ever shall live.

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