ENGLISH POETRY 1579-1830: SPENSER AND THE TRADITION

Dr. Henry Baker

(1698-1774)


The son of a Chancery clerk, "Microscope" Baker was apprenticed to John Parker, a bookseller, though he later made his fortune teaching the deaf and dumb. He was Defoe's son-in-law, a member of the Society of Antiquaries (1740), Fellow of the Royal Society (1741), and a founder of the Society of Arts (1754). With Defoe, he edited the Universal Spectator and Weekly Journal (1728-33); he founded the Bakerian lecture of the Royal Society. Bonamy Dobree notes that "posterity's chief debt to him is as the introducer of rhubarb into England" OHEL (1959) 399.


TEXT RECORDS:

1723An Invocation of Health. A Poem.
1741[To Meanwell: On Jealousy.]

PUBLICATIONS:

An invocation of health: a poem. 1723.
Original poems: serious and humorous. 1725.
Second part of original poems. 1726
The universe: a poem. 1727.
Medulla poetarum romanorum: or the most beautiful and instructive passages of the Roman poets, with translations in English verse. 2 vols, 1737.
The works of Moliere [trans, with James Miller]. 8 vols. 1739.
The universal spectator, ed. Baker. 1728-33; 4 vols, 1756.
The microscope made easy. 1743.
Employment for the microscope. 1753.